EV Infrastructure Summit

EV Infrastructure Summit has been designed with cities, local authorities and commercial end users in mind, to help them build an effective strategy to enable the roll out of EV infrastructure to benefit the communities in which they are located.

Rapid action and investment is needed, and this means attracting the brightest talent to the industry. On the 4th July, the summit will kick off with a breakfast seminar, supported by EWIRE, in which a panel will discuss how we can encourage more women into the industry. Open Energi’s Head of Data Science, Robyn Lucas, will be part of this panel.

Date: 3-4 July 2018

Location: America Square Conference Centre, London, UK

Topic: How do we encourage more women into the industry?

Panellist: Robyn Lucas, Head of Data Science

More information is available from the event website.

Smart Energy Marketplace 2018

Smart Energy Marketplace

Regen’s Smart Energy Marketplace is the largest smart and renewable energy event in the south-west, taking place on 19 June at Sandy Park Exeter and attended by over 500 leading companies from across the clean energy and built environment sectors.

Now in its eighth year, the event has evolved to provide the perfect platform for industry experts to focus on the energy system as a whole, including energy efficiency, the gas network, electricity systems and disruptive new technologies such as energy storage and electric vehicle infrastructure.

Date: 19 June 2018

Location: Sandy Park, Exeter

Topic: Local flexibility markets

Speaker: Robyn Lucas, Head of Data Science

Further information is available from the event website.

X-Energy

X Energy

Open Energi is proud to once again be sponsoring X Energy. Organised by The Crowd, the event will bring together senior energy, sustainability, property, and facilities professionals to explore the intersection of energy and tech, inspiring and connecting the leading minds from a mix of energy intensive sectors.

It will explore how disruptive technologies, new energy management strategies and financing models are exponentially changing energy programmes in large organisations, and share knowledge and latest thinking amongst the community.

Date: 1 October 2018

Location: London

Further information and details on how to apply for a space are available from the The Crowd’s website.

 

Clean Energy News: Q&A Open Energi discusses the future of demand response

Following the launch of the follow-up to its popular demand response product Dynamic Demand, Clean Energy News caught up with Open Energi technical director Michael Bironneau and commercial director David Hill to discuss the platform’s development, demand response’s role in the energy transition and how it will change in the future.

Q: How has Open Energi looked to develop Dynamic Demand 2.0, and what’s contributed to it?

Michael Bironneau (MB): Historically Open Energi has been involved in the control of thousands of distributed assets, and in order to do that we often had to do a lot of very manual work to model the asset or understand its control philosophy. Once we’d done that, we still had to understand how to predict its performance characteristics and forecast when it would be available to us. That’s why our data science team is one of the largest in the business.

Read the full article here.

Faster Frequency Response: A Cost-effective Solution to Future System Balancing

open energi wind farm

Creating a sustainable energy future will take decades and the pace of technological development will lead to ideas and solutions that no one has even thought of yet. This innovation will come from the next generation of energy leaders, who are already conducting vital research at universities across the globe.

 Over the last year, we’re delighted to have been supporting Yifu Ding, who is studying for an MSc in Sustainable Energy Futures at Imperial College. Yifu has been assessing the value of faster frequency response times in power systems, and Open Energi’s Dagoberto Cedillos has been one of her supervisors. Yifu’s project was recognized as the Best MSc Research Project in the cohort, and we’re pleased to share a post from Yifu about her work.
Y_Ding_Headshot

What is System Inertia?

In a stable power system operating with a fixed nominal frequency (50 Hz in the UK) electricity supplies must closely match loads on a continuous, second-by-second basis. This is especially difficult during some special cases such as the power pick-ups after big football games or a royal wedding.

Undoubtedly, achieving such a real-time balance is not a simple thing, but there are many approaches. Large power systems have an inherent property which provides the quickest response for contingencies. In a conventional power plant like coal, gas and even nuclear, electricity is generated by a turbine, basically a large spinning mass of metal. The inertia stored in these rotating turbines provides an energy store which automatically stabilises the system and insulates it from sudden shocks. In an event of a generation outage or surge in demand, inertial energy is released which prevents the frequency from falling. Equally the inverse happens in the case of a sharp increase in electricity supply or decrease in demand.

After that, the system operator begins to manipulate power assets through an array of automated measures already in place (like different frequency response products) and by sending out manual notifications. In response to these, large-scale power stations adjust their outputs. Hydroelectric reservoirs release or pump water. Aggregators control loads or battery assets they manage to provide a response.

Challenges for System Balancing

In light of the decarbonisation trend, great changes have been undertaken in the UK power system. Old methods relying on fossil-fueled power plants to balance the system are challenged and we need to explore new options.

As a rule of thumb, we are losing the system inertia. According to the National Grid System Operator Framework (SOF) 2016, approximately 70% of the UK system inertia is provided by thermal power plants. Unfortunately, the rapidly increasing volume of renewable generation units with power electronics interfaces, including solar PV and wind turbines, are not synchronized with the Grid. Therefore they don’t contribute to the system inertia.

Fig1a synchronous coupling

Figure 1: Generators contributing (or not) to the system inertia (From National Grid SOF 2016)
Figure 1: Generators contributing (or not) to the system inertia (From National Grid SOF 2016)

In our research, we considered ‘Gone Green’ and ‘Steady State’ scenarios from National Grid Future Energy Scenarios (FES) 2017, to compare and contrast what could happen in the near-term future. We found out that the inertia of the UK system will fall from 198 GVAs in 2015 to 132 -155 GVAs by 2025, as large numbers of thermal power plants are closed to meet carbon reduction targets.

Figure 2: The future scenarios considered in this research according to National Grid FES 2017
Figure 2: The future scenarios considered in this research according to National Grid FES 2017

Why Faster Frequency Response?

From this point of view, our power system will become more ‘erratic’ than before due to lack of this self-stabilization property. To counter this we could use more Frequency Response (FR) services, or perhaps something else?

We can envisage a power system with a stable frequency as a large tank with a stable level of water. The current inlet and outlet represent the generation and demand respectively. If a sudden imbalance occurs between inlet and outlet, we need to respond quickly in case the water level becomes too low or overflows.

In this fashion, one of the effective solutions is delivering faster-acting response. In July 2016, National Grid launched and tendered a sub-second FR service called Enhanced Frequency Response (EFR). Currently it is provided by batteries which can respond fast enough to provide a similar level of security to the inertial response from conventional power generators.

Value of Enhanced Frequency Responses

A few statistics from our research and other documents give you an idea of the exact economic benefit from delivering this new FR service.

By developing an optimization mathematical model to simulate power generation, dispatch and balancing in a row, we estimated the economic benefits of EFR will reach £564 to £992 per kW by 2020. National Grid has already contracted 201 MW of EFR, therefore the total economic benefit is estimated to be up to £200 million. This result conforms to the estimation published by National Grid on 26 Aug 2016.

Figure 3: A screenshot of the daily power generation and dispatch outcomes from the optimization model.
Figure 3: A screenshot of the daily power generation and dispatch outcomes from the optimization model.

But this isn’t the whole story. Although the fast-acting FR service demonstrates many advantages, there are still obstacles when it comes to the implementation.  For the system operator, an issue which might arise is how to determine the optimal mix of those FR products. Otherwise some of them could be undersubscribed or oversubscribed as mentioned in System Needs and Product Strategy (SNAP) report from National Grid.

Stakeholders in the balancing markets, such as electricity storage operators, can make themselves invaluable by providing such a service. However, we should note that it is designed to be fulfilled continuously, meaning it’s unlikely to be delivered in combination with other network services. In this case, the operator can only obtain the single revenue from the asset, risky from an investor perspective. Providing such a service is technically challenging since it requires a sophisticated state of charge (SoC) control to meet the service specifications and manage battery throughput.

As we look into the future balancing markets, fast-acting FR services indeed provide a cost-effective solution towards the low-carbon power system. Planned streamlining of  procurement mechanisms and ongoing technology development will help to fully unlock its potential.

 

Business Development Manager

Oxford Brookes campus

About Us

Headquartered in London with global ambitions, Open Energi is an energy tech company applying artificial intelligence and data-driven insight to radically reduce the cost of delivering and consuming power.

Our advanced technology platform connects, aggregates and optimises distributed energy assets in real-time, maximising value for end users and providing invisible demand flexibility when and where it is most needed to create a more sustainable energy future.

We’re breaking new ground in demand-side management, working with leading businesses, suppliers, developers and world-renowned technology partners to deliver innovative solutions that put our customers in control of how, when and from where they consume electricity.

If you would enjoy the challenge of deploying a ground-breaking technology into an emerging market and want to work for an innovative company where you have complete belief in the product and service you represent, we might be just the place for you.

The Role

We are looking for an experienced Business Development Manager to join our growing team. You will be reporting to our Commercial Director. The role will involve leading and managing sales campaigns to support the acquisition of corporate customers. The successful candidate must focus on the creation of best practice across all aspects of sales management to include:

  • Develop and execute sales and marketing campaigns to meet company targets
  • Define the sales cycle from a strategic and tactical perspective detailing the customer acquisition and implementation process
  • Facilitate “right first time” customer qualification to improve workflow / handover and ultimately shorten the sales cycle through lean and efficient processes
  • Achieve / exceed business targets, expressed in terms of number of won accounts including revenue and margin
  • Influence and shape the customer’s energy strategy via board level interactions developing strategic partnerships
  • Create business opportunity for Open Energi across all customer asset bases by understanding the corporate usage profiles and how best to utilise group assets to deliver mutual value
  • Be accountable for all sales performance measures including pipeline development, appointment ratios, conversion measures and management of the sales CRM system
  • Ability to develop bespoke sales propositions to meet complex customer requirements
  • Adopt a strategic selling approach, which considers technical and economic buying influences to be active at influencer, recommender and decision maker levels
  • Utilise the Open Energi sales qualification model and CRM system to maximise effective account wins
  • Develop an in depth understanding of the business drivers and requirements including technical, economic and environmental influencers in key vertical segments

Requirements

We’re looking for someone with:

  • At least 5 years’ work experience in a similar role
  • Proven experience and success in direct sales, generating new business in a business-to-business or Public Sector corporate market
  • Proven ability to develop and maintain an effective network of contacts and build relationships at all levels of the customer / prospect organisation
  • High level of literacy, written communication and analytical skills
  • High level of numeracy & commercial judgement
  • Self-starter with effective problem-solving abilities, especially for unstructured tasks
  • Interest or expertise in the energy market
  • Enthusiasm for new technologies and their potential impact
  • Commercial and financial knowledge
  • Excellent communication skills, capable of clearly articulating data to a wide audience

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject, achieving at least a 2:1
  • Post-graduate education (such as a Masters’) is desirable, but not essential

Remuneration and Benefits

  • Competitive salary with discretionary bonus
  • Based in Open Energi’s London office
  • Career development opportunities

To apply

Please send a covering letter and CV to recruitment@openenergi.com. Due to the quantity of applications we receive, we regret that we are unable to give specific feedback on unsuccessful applications.

Commercial Analyst

Dynamic Demand 2.0

About Us

Headquartered in London with global ambitions, Open Energi is an energy tech company applying artificial intelligence and data-driven insight to radically reduce the cost of delivering and consuming power.

Our advanced technology platform connects, aggregates and optimises distributed energy assets in real-time, maximising value for end users and providing invisible demand flexibility when and where it is most needed to create a more sustainable energy future.

We’re breaking new ground in demand-side management, working with leading businesses, suppliers, developers and world-renowned technology partners to deliver innovative solutions that put our customers in control of how, when and from where they consume electricity.

If you would enjoy the challenge of deploying a ground-breaking technology into an emerging market and want to work for an innovative company where you have complete belief in the product and service you represent, we might be just the place for you.

The Role

We are looking for a Commercial Analyst to join our growing team. You’ll be reporting to our Commercial Manager and working closely alongside our Data Science and Technology teams to help inform business strategy and ensure our market leading solutions stay ahead of the curve. It’s a start-up environment, so you will be working on multiple tasks and must be comfortable working across teams and projects.

The role will include:

  • Commercial analysis and support
    • Working with data scientists on performance reporting
    • Internal reporting for investors and Finance team
    • Using models and other quantitative methods to support the Commercial team as required
    • Risk and scenario analysis
    • Market research and analysis of UK & international demand response markets
    • Researching new services and assessing their commercial value
    • Business case development and commercial agreements
  • Policy, sales & marketing support
    • Techno-economic modelling
    • Researching emerging technologies relevant to the business (e.g. energy storage)
    • Policy analysis and briefing of business on key industry and regulatory issues

Requirements

We’re looking for someone with:

  • At least 2 years’ work experience in a similar role
  • Strong quantitative background
  • High level of literacy, written communication and analytical skills
  • High level of numeracy & commercial judgement
  • Strong Excel modelling skills
  • Self-starter with effective problem-solving abilities, especially for unstructured tasks
  • A critical thinker with intellectual curiosity and thoughtful opinions
  • Interest or expertise in the energy market
  • Enthusiasm for new technologies and their potential impact
  • Commercial and financial knowledge
  • Excellent communication skills, capable of clearly articulating data to a wide audience

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject, achieving at least a 2:1
  • Post-graduate education (such as a Masters’) is desirable, but not essential

 Remuneration and Benefits

  • Competitive salary with discretionary bonus
  • Based in Open Energi’s London office
  • Career development opportunities

 To apply

Please send a covering letter and CV to recruitment@openenergi.com. Due to the quantity of applications we receive, we regret that we are unable to give specific feedback on unsuccessful applications.

edie: EVs could provide 11GW grid capacity by 2030, research claims

Electric vehicles (EV) could deliver more than 11GW of flexible capacity to the grid by 2030, according to new analysis from a leading energy technology firm.

Open Energi says its research shows the potential for EVs to efficiently support renewables, reduce stress on the grid and balance electricity supply and demand.

The study predicts that with an estimated EVs on the road by 2020, smart charging could unlock up to 550MW and 1.3GW of turn-up and turn-down flexibility respectively at different times of the day. By 2030, this rises to 3GW of turn-up and 8GW of turn-down flexibility respectively.

Open Energi strategy and innovation lead Dago Cedillos said: “The electrification of transport is happening faster than anyone expected and EVs are set to have a significant impact on infrastructure, systems and markets.

Read the full article here.

Energy Live News: EVs could offer 11GW of grid flexibility by 2030

Electric vehicles (EVs) could offer 11GW of rapid flexibility to the UK’s energy grid by 2030.

That’s according to energy tech developer Open Energi, which suggests smart charging, which is when vehicles are charged automatically at optimal times, could support renewable generation, balance supply and demand and alleviate strain on the network.

The firm finds by 2020, an estimated 1.6 million EVs on the road could provide up to 550MW of turn-up flexibility and around 1.3GW of turn-down flexibility.

Read the full article here.

How EVs can help drive a more sustainable energy future

Tesla South Mimms Supercharger and PowerPack

Electric Vehicles (EVs) have taken off in 2017 with governments, manufacturers and industry queuing up to announce bold commitments, product launches and sales figures. Suddenly, EVs have shifted from being a future technology, to a technology of the here and now.

The next decade will be critical for EVs, and their accelerating deployment will have a significant impact on infrastructure systems and markets. A lot of attention has been given to ‘worst-case’ scenarios but smart charging technology means EVs can be managed to the benefit of the system, accelerating our transition to a sustainable energy future and supporting low carbon growth. New analysis by Open Energi suggests that EVs could provide over 11GW of flexible capacity to the UK’s energy system by 2030.

Rise of EVs

The next decade will be incredibly important for EVs, and their deployment has been strengthened by manufacturer commitment, government influence and price curves. Manufacturers including Volvo, Jaguar, and Volkswagen to name a few have made bold statements, claiming the electrification of their product lines and assigning large budgets for R&D. Global EV line-up will almost double by 2020, as the release of Chevy’s Bolt, Tesla’s Model 3 and Nissan’s new Leaf lead EVs into the mainstream.

Governments such as France and the UK have agreed to ban sales of diesel vehicles by 2040. Other countries have set aggressive sales targets, for example China, who has set a 7m target in its 2025 Auto Plan. And all want to become world leaders in EV technology. Here in the UK, BEIS has announced funding for battery and V2G technology development with further funding announced in the Autumn Budget.

Technology development and manufacturing scale-up continues to drive prices down. Battery prices, which account for around 50% of the cost of an EV, have fallen more than 75% since 2010 and are expected to continue to do so at about 7% year on year to 2030. Analysis from both UBS and BNEF claims price parity will be achieved in Europe, US and China sometime in the 2020s, repeatedly accelerating the next million of sales.

The first million takes the longest: length of time, in months, to reach electric vehicle sales milestones
The first million takes the longest: length of time, in months, to reach electric vehicle sales milestones

EVs and electricity demand

According to BNEF, in 2040 54% of global new car sales and 33% of the global fleet will be electric, with a demand of up to 1,800 TWh (5% of projected global power consumption). In the UK, National Grid suggests around 9 million EVs will be on the road by 2030[1]. This uptake in EVs will have a significant effect on our electricity system.

Source: National Grid Future Energy Scenarios 2017 (Two Degrees)
Source: National Grid Future Energy Scenarios 2017 (Two Degrees)

 

Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance
Source: Bloomberg New Energy Finance

Although EV charging will cause an increase in overall electrical energy demand, the greater challenge lies in where, when and how this charging takes place. The overall electricity demand change will be a single-digit percentage increase but if all this energy is consumed at the same time of day, it could result in double digit percentage increases in peak power demand. This creates challenges for generation capacity and for local networks, who could be put under strain to meet these surges in power demand.

There has been a lot of attention given to the worst-case impact EVs could have on the system – but less analysis of the benefit they could bring as a flexible grid resource controlled by smart charging. At Open Energi, we have used a bottom up approach to quantify the flexibility EVs could offer the UK’s energy system, and the opportunities it could create.

Flexibility scenarios

Different charging scenarios were designed based on the charging speeds currently available and their granular flexibility was quantified (see below for a full description of the methodology). Then, the time at which each of these scenarios is likely to occur was evaluated. Finally, using EV fleet forecasts, volume was attributed to each scenario and a set of future flexibility profiles produced.

EV speed table

EV charging scenarios table

By 2020, with around 1.6 million EVs on the road, Open Energi’s analysis suggests there could exist between 200 – 550 MW of turn-up and between 400 and 1.3GW of turn-down flexibility to be unlocked from smart-charging. The available flexibility would change throughout the day depending on charging patterns and scenarios. In 2030, with 9 million EVs on the road, this rises to up to 3GW of turn-up and 8GW of turn-down flexibility respectively.

EV flex profile 2020 down

EV flex profile 2020 up EV flex profile table

Opportunities: smart charging for flexibility

Smart charging technology turns EVs from a threat to grid stability into an asset that can work for the benefit of the system. Optimal night-dispatch for example, can ensure all vehicles are charged by the time they’ll be used the next day without compromising their local network infrastructure. Cars could help to absorb energy during periods of oversupply, and to ease down demand during periods of undersupply. On an aggregate basis, they can help the system operator, National Grid, with its real-time balancing challenge, and provide much needed flexibility to support growing levels of renewable generation. Suppliers could work with charge point operators to balance their trading portfolios and manage imbalance risk, helping to lower costs for consumers.

Of course, smart charging can only happen with the consent of the driver, and drivers will only consent if their car is charged and ready to go when they need it. This means deploying artificial intelligence and data insight to automate charging without affecting user experience, so that the technology can learn and respond to changing patterns of consumer behaviour and deliver an uninterrupted driver experience. Getting this right is key to aligning the future of sustainable energy and transport.

Dago Cedillos is Strategy and Innovation Lead at Open Energi

Methodology

Open Energi’s methodology consists of a bottom up approach, looking at the different charging scenarios and quantifying the flexibility from each of them. The time at which each of these scenarios is likely to occur has been analysed. Finally, using EV fleet forecasts, based on National Grid Future Energy Scenario forecasts (2017, Two Degrees), we’ve attributed volume to each scenario and generated a flexibility profile.

Charging speeds

We formulated our charging scenarios based on the different charging speeds and the capabilities of each. Charging speeds are currently referred to as Slow, Fast and Rapid as set out below.

EV speed tableScenarios

Based on these speeds, we built some scenarios considering the use-cases. Slow charging is likely to be used at home, Fast charging in public spaces and Rapid in public spaces and forecourts. We assumed typical plug-in durations for these charging scenarios.

EV charging scenarios table

Main assumptions

Considering the charging scenarios, calculations were performed on the turn-up and turn-down capabilities of each. An important element of this analysis, the average daily energy requirement per vehicle, was based on the following assumptions:

  • Average daily miles travelled per vehicle: 20.54 (based on UK National Transport Survey’s VMT)
  • A conservative assumption of 20kWh/100km (the Chevy bolt can travel 238 miles on a 60kWh battery)

EV electricity demand table
This leads to the figures in table (above), which align closely with National Grid’s Future Energy Scenarios 2017 when using their fleet forecasts.

Extracting flexibility

Different likely situations were built for each scenario, using 7kWh as a simple rule of thumb of what an EV would require as charge per day. For example, for the ‘Long’ scenario: using a 3kW (B) slow charger, energy to be charged (A) was evaluated for the different likely situations (J). Potential turn-up (F) and turn-down (H) was defined and saturation/underperformance parameters (G & I) were introduced for this flexibility. That is, to charge (A) using speed (B), there would only be (I) hours of turn-down flexibility (H) in an optimal case before underperformance (i.e. not fully charging the vehicle). This was repeated across all scenarios using the range of charging speeds, plug-in durations and rates of charge eligible for each to quantify flexibility.

Energy to charge table
The average flexibility potential for each possibility was calculated as a kW value, as the product of (F) & (G) and (H) & (I) divided by plug-in time (D). This was the estimated average kW value of flexibility for a vehicle under the option in the scenario. Max, mid and min flexibility values were defined for each scenario based on the options calculated per scenario.

Flexibility profiles

Having the average flexibility per vehicle for each scenario, this was then converted into a flexibility profile considering the following assumptions:

  • Long scenario (home charging) likely to take place during the night.
  • Medium scenario (workplace charging) likely to take place during office hours.
  • Short scenario (shopping/dining) likely to take place during early morning, lunch and after office hours.
  • Ultra-short scenario (forecourts) likely to take place during early morning, lunch and after office hours.

Time of day tableAttributing vehicle volume to each scenario was then performed as follows. Data from the Department of Transport[2] indicates that approximately 50-55% of households owning a vehicle have access to off-street parking. Open Energi assumed the following share of vehicles per scenario[3]. Further work needs to be carried out to define how this share will evolve over time with the development of charging technology.

Share 2020 table
The aggregate flexibility for each hour which defines the profile was then calculated using the flexibility per vehicle and scenario, the scenario schedules, and the number of vehicles in each scenario and for each time period (2017, 2020, 2030 and 2040).

[1] National Grid Future Energy Scenarios 2017 (Two Degrees)

[2] Department of Transport survey: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20111006052633/http:/dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/trsnstatsatt/parking.html

[3] Open Energi identified a gap in data available to define these shares with accuracy, these will have to be reviewed over time.