Cenex LCV event 2018

Cenex LCV 2018

Cenex-LCV is the UK’s premier low carbon vehicle event incorporating a seminar programme, technology exhibition, low carbon community networking and ride & drive of the latest research & development and commercially available vehicles.

LCV is run by Cenex, the UK’s first centre of excellence for low carbon and fuel cell technologies with assistance from Supporting Partners including the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, the Centre for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles, the Office for Low Emission Vehicles, the Department for International Trade, the Advanced Propulsion Centre, the Automotive Council, Innovate UK, the Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership, the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, and Transport Systems Catapult.

Date: 12-13th September 2018

Location: Millbrook, Bedfordshire

Speaker: Robyn Lucas, Head of Data Science

Further information is available from the event website.

BNEF Future of Energy Summit

BNEF logo

Since its inception in 2008, the BNEF Future of Energy Summit has featured a unique convergence of the old and the new – traditional players and advanced-energy leaders. It continues to create an environment for making new connections, and serves as a forum to discuss the critical energy issues of today and the next decade.

Date: 1st-2nd October 2018

Location: Intercontinental Hotel, Mayfair, London

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the conference website.

Power Responsive success stories: Aggregate Industries

National Grid’s Summer Reception 2018 profiled Aggregate Industries’ pioneering partnership with Open Energi as an example of real life achievements to unlock demand side flexibility and the innovation and collaboration within the industry.

Aggregate Industries is the first business to deploy Open Energi’s artificial intelligence-powered flexibility platform, Dynamic Demand 2.0, to deliver electricity cost savings of 10%.

40 bitumen tanks at ten Aggregate Industries’ sites UK-wide have already been connected to the platform, which uses artificial intelligence to automatically optimise their daily electricity use in response to a variety of signals, including wholesale electricity prices, peak price charges, fluctuations in grid frequency, and system imbalance prices.

Aggregate Industries is accessing the imbalance market via Renewable Balancing Reserve (RBR), a product offered by its renewable electricity supplier, Ørsted. RBR enables Aggregate Industries to tap into the financial benefits of participating in the imbalance market, by reducing its demand at certain times.

Over time Aggregate Industries plans to expand its use of Dynamic Demand 2.0 to 48 asphalt plants UK-wide – representing up to 4.5MW of demand flexibility. It is also exploring its wider portfolio of assets and processes to identify where further benefits may lie.

Talking to National Grid, Richard Eaton, Energy Manager at Aggregate Industries explained: “What we’re doing now is rolling out Open Energi’s Dynamic Demand 2.0 platform, where what we do is we flex our assets, not only to calls from National Grid, but also now to calls from Ørsted under their Renewable Balancing Reserve.

“The artificial intelligence within Dynamic Demand 2.0 is helping us to optimise our bitumen tanks leading to a predicted 10-15% reduction in the operating costs of those assets.”

What National Grid’s latest forecasts mean for EV flexibility

EV smart charging

Last week National Grid published its 2018 Future Energy ScenariosMost notably, this year’s scenarios forecast there could be as many as 36 million electric vehicles (EVs) on UK roads by 2040, almost double the number suggested a year ago.

Accelerating EV uptake will increase overall electricity demand – with EVs accounting for 7.5% of total electricity demand by 2040 – but the impact of EVs can be managed and controlled thanks to smart charging and vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology, which means EVs can be turned into a flexible asset which works for the benefit of the system.

The report recognises this – modelling the impact of V2G technology for the first time – and highlights the role of EVs in helping to manage peaks and troughs in demand and provide stored energy to support growing levels of renewable generation.

 

 

EV electricity consumption 2018

Open Energi have updated our modelling of EV flexibility to reflect National Grid’s latest forecasts. By 2030, with up to 11 million EVs on the road, our analysis suggests there could exist between 1.1–3.7GW of turn-up and between 2.5-8.5GW of turn-down flexibility to be unlocked from smart-charging. The available flexibility would change throughout the day depending on charging patterns and scenarios. In 2040, with 36 million EVs on the road, this rises to up to 12.6GW of turn-up and 29.7GW of turn-down flexibility respectively.   Our current analysis does not include V2G so these calculations will eventually be higher depending on the level of V2G penetration achieved.

 

EV flexibility 2018

 

EV Flexibility turn down profile 2020

 

EV flexibility profile 2020 turn-up

Open Energi is working to make these figures a reality.

We are part of the PowerLoop consortium, a 3-year, £7 million project backed by Innovate UK to develop the UK’s first large-scale domestic V2G trial. The consortium includes Octopus Energy, Octopus Electric Vehicles, UK Power Networks, ChargePoint Services, Energy Saving Trust and Navigant.

Open Energi is leading on developing a bespoke V2G aggregation platform and is working closely with UK Power Networks to integrate domestic V2G into their flexibility services.  Together, we aim to demonstrate the benefits of using domestic V2G to support the grid and reduce costs for drivers.

In parallel, we’re working with businesses to develop EV charging and fleet management strategies that deliver valuable savings and income and support companies’ wider energy management and sustainability goals. Our Dynamic Demand 2.0 platform means EVs can be controlled and optimised alongside other energy assets – including on-site generation and storage – to ensure vehicles are charged and ready when needed, site constraints are managed, and value is maximised.

With the right technology in place, we can manage the impact of EVs on the electricity system, create the foundations for mass adoption and align sustainable energy and transport needs for the future.

For the full methodology behind our EV flexibility calculations, click here.

Dagoberto Cedillos, Strategy and Innovation Lead, Open Energi

EV Infrastructure Summit – 29.11.18

EV Infrastructure Summit

Taking place on the 29th November, the EV Infrastructure Summit will focus on the opportunities and challenges involved in establishing a UK-wide charging infrastructure as part of the transition to zero emission vehicles.

The day will feature presentations and debates from leading industry experts and government representatives on the key topics involved in the roll-out of the required charging infrastructure.

Open Energi’s Commercial Director, David Hill, is joining a panel discussion on “Making EV’s a positive win for the energy system: opportunities and challenges”.

Date: 29th November 2018

Location: CCT Venues – Docklands, London

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Session: 12.40pm – “Making EV’s a positive win for the energy system: opportunities and challenges”

Further information is available from the event website.

Smart Energy Summit: Industry. Buildings. Cities. – 26/27.03.19

electricity pylons

Held in Moscow, the 3rd Smart Energy Summit: Industry. Buildings. Cities. is designed to unite the largest energy, industrial enterprises and leading world experts in the field of innovative, digital and Internet solutions for the energy sector to explore new models of generation, distribution, management and accumulation of energy. The 2019 programme includes:

  1.  Internet of Energy: Distributed generation, Smart grids and microgrid, Energy storage systems, Digital platforms, Big data analysis, New markets.
  2. Smart Energy Experience & Practice: Energy of industrial enterprises, Energy of buildings and infrastructure facilities, Energy of cities and regions.
  3. Energy Tech Hub: Startup expo, Pitch session, Hackathon.

Open Energi is delighted to be participating in the event. Our Commercial Director David Hill will be discussing new business models for battery storage and presenting practical examples of projects from the UK.

Date: 26-27th March 2019

Location: Moscow

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the event website.

MEUC Autumn Roadshows

MEUC

We’re delighted to be sponsoring this Autumn’s MEUC Roadshow, which features a full conference programme of educational seminars on energy and water; expert presentations on key topics and networking exhibition with leading energy and water industry suppliers and advisors.

London – 4th October 2018

Leeds – 10th October 2018

Further information is available from the event website.

EV charging: 5 factors every business should consider

Tesla South Mimms Supercharger and PowerPack

As Electric Vehicle (EV) uptake accelerates and costs fall, more and more companies are exploring how to electrify their vehicle fleets and offer EV charging to employees and/or customers. Delivering sustainable transport solutions will cut carbon and improve air quality, but businesses need to think carefully about the impact on their electricity demand and how they manage EV charging as part of their wider energy strategy.

Dagoberto Cedillos, Strategy & Innovation Lead at Open Energi, explores five factors every business should consider, and how, with the right approach, EVs can be managed to deliver valuable savings and income.

1. Charging infrastructure

There are a large and growing number of EV models on the market with progressively faster charging speeds and bigger ranges. Charging set-ups differ across manufacturers, although two favoured options seem to be emerging; Type 1 and CHAdeMO or Type 2 and CCS (Zap Map offer a good overview of this).

In the UK Type 2 is by far the most commonly available chargepoint. Understanding fleet or workplace/customer charging requirements should inform what charging infrastructure is most appropriate, but of course fast or rapid connectors will have a larger impact in terms of electricity demand.

EV charging speeds

2. Connection size:

EVs can instantly draw a lot of power from the grid. Today’s rapid chargers typically charge at up to 50kW (although Tesla’s are faster), but newer models are expected to charge at 150kW and beyond.  If you are offering fast/rapid charging and expect to have many vehicles charging at once, you may need to expand your connection size. A larger connection will cost more but will enable you to meet higher demand without exceeding your import limits – assuming the local electricity network has the capacity. An alternative approach is to stagger the timing of vehicle charging so that you avoid creating a surge in power demand (‘smart queuing’), enabling a smaller, less expensive connection. Similarly, if you have on-site renewable generation or energy storage, these can be used alongside EV charging to manage demand and make the most of clean, cheap electricity when it is available.

3. Charging patterns

It’s really important to think about expected charging patterns. If it’s your own fleet will they all be charging overnight only, weekdays versus weekends, or on a rolling 24/7 basis? Similarly for employees or customer charging facilities, will charging be condensed into working or opening hours or could the facilities be used more widely? The more flexibility you have to manage and spread EV charging the better, but you have to start by focusing on the requirements and expectations of the driver. A supermarket customer might only connect for twenty minutes but won’t want their charging interrupted. Someone at work could plug their vehicle in for eight hours or more, so probably won’t mind if you delay or interrupt their charging as long as their vehicle is charged and ready to go when they finish work. Smart queuing, which automates optimal queuing and charge dispatch of EVs can manage this process to support local network needs and ensure vehicle charging is prioritised in the appropriate order.

EV value streams4. How many and where

If charging stations are dispersed in small numbers across multiple sites that will be much easier to manage and integrate with existing infrastructure than a large number all at one site. However, if your charging is concentrated in one place, this will make it easier to capture value from smart charging and EV flexibility. Local flexibility markets are emerging, and the ability to turn-down demand quickly and efficiently could provide a valuable service to local Distribution Network Operators. The business case for aggregating and delivering this kind of service from EVs becomes more compelling where there are economies of scale to be gained from connecting to many vehicles in one place.

5. Electricity bill

It’s important to assess the impact EVs will have on your electricity bill. Understanding this, and the nature of the tariff structure you have with your supplier, will help to identify where the opportunities for optimisation lie. Minimising charging during peak price periods and maximising charging when electricity is at its cheapest is an obvious first step, but the ability to manage the timing of EV charging also opens up potential revenue streams. For example, as renewable generation grows instances of negative pricing – when you get paid to consume electricity – are expected to occur more often. With the right technology in place, your EVs could respond to these price signals and get paid to charge your EV fleet. More generally, the ability to respond to fluctuations in electricity supply and demand and provide short-term balancing services – i.e. a few minutes – to the System Operator can be extremely valuable.

If you have any questions or would like to discuss your business’ EV charging strategy in more detail, please get in touch.

Engineering Technician

Headquartered in London with global ambitions, Open Energi is using advanced technology and data-driven insight to create a more sustainable energy future.

Our Dynamic Demand 2.0 platform connects and controls distributed energy resources to help businesses save costs, earn revenue and cut carbon.

We are breaking new ground in demand-side management, working with leading businesses, suppliers, developers and world-renowned technology partners to deliver innovative solutions that put our customers in control of how, when and from where they consume electricity.

If you would enjoy the challenge of deploying a ground-breaking technology into an emerging market and want to work for an innovative company where you have complete belief in the product and service you represent, we might be just the place for you.

We are seeking an Engineering Technician to provide hands-on support for our technology roll-outs and commissioning projects at client sites throughout the UK. The role gives a clear career path leading to a Project Engineer role and beyond.

This role would suit someone:

  • who demonstrates a strong aptitude for technical-based subject matter in the early stages of their career; or someone looking to redirect their career towards a more technical, hands-on role.
  • with related experience, e.g. electrical, mechanical with electrical bias, or a related technical domain
  • who has completed an electrical apprenticeship with site experience.
  • who is a graduate in an engineering-related discipline.

Provided you are interested in gaining hands-on technical experience in the work place, and a career in developing a new technology in the energy sector, we will ensure you gain all the knowledge and skills you need.

The successful candidate will be based from home but will be required to attend our central London Head Office and travel to client premises/sites throughout the UK, with overnight stays where necessary.

Place of work

  • Work from home – extensive travel across UK

Benefits

  • Car allowance
  • Pension

Main Purpose of Role:

Support the Project Engineer to design software and hardware integrations for Open Energi’s portfolio of assets, from concept to project sign-off

  • Support technical surveys of client assets and processes to identify customer requirements
  • Produce accurate documentation detailing work carried out on site
  • On-site and remote commissioning of Open Energi equipment
  • Work in the Open Energi Lab to support development projects
  • Attend client sites to maintain and service Open Energi electrical equipment
  • Maintain Asset Register of Open Energi equipment
  • Provide feedback on solutions to support continuous improvement

Essential Skills & Knowledge

  • Safety conscious
  • Have a wide interest in how and why things work
  • Strong competence using engineering hand tools and equipment
  • Aptitude for electro mechanical assembly (or similar related discipline); demonstrate manual dexterity
  • Ability to work from electrical drawings and wiring diagrams
  • Sharp, quick, dedicated and innovative problem solver, methodical with strong analytical skills
  • Effective communication skills, both verbal and written
  • Good working knowledge of Microsoft Office suite
  • Robust work ethic showing high levels of reliability, punctuality and dependability
  • Eager to continuously grow and learn new skills
  • Demonstrate good attention to detail along with a desire for continuous improvement
  • Teamworking and the ability to build strong relationships with co-workers
  • Recognised qualification and experience in electrical safe working practices
  • Full UK driving licence with own vehicle

Desired Skills & Knowledge

  • 17th edition electrician qualified
  • Experience working in an industrial site environment
  • BMS (Tridium, Trend) or PLC
  • Knowledge of networking and communication protocols (RS232, RS485, IP, Modbus, BACnet)

Principal Accountabilities

  • Take care for personal health and safety and that of others who may be affected by your acts or omissions
  • Carry out assigned tasks and duties in a safe manner, in accordance with instructions and comply with safety rules/procedures, regulations and codes of practice
  • Co-operate with others on health and safety, and not interfere with or misuse anything provided for your health, safety or welfare
  • Report any accident, hazard, near-miss, dangerous occurrence or dangerous condition to your line manager and/or raise the appropriate Hazard/Near Miss Report
  • Co-operate with the company, clients and sub-contractors to enable them to discharge their own responsibilities successfully and safely

Discover the value of your demand flexibility – explore our VR world!

Open Energi VR landscape

Your electricity demand may be more flexible than you realise. Our analysis suggests that on average up to 50% of a business’ electricity demand can be shifted for up to one hour, with zero disruption to operational performance.

This flexibility is vital to support more renewable power and create a sustainable energy future.

In the UK, it’s created a £9 billion market opportunity. But how much could it be worth to your business?

Explore our Virtual Reality world to find out:

vr.openenergi.com 

Open Energi’s Flexible Energy Survey service provides an accurate, independent assessment of your site’s total demand flexibility and the commercial opportunity it represents for your business.

It includes:

  • Comprehensive site survey carried out by qualified engineers with unique experience assessing distributed energy resources for demand-side incentives.
  • Detailed feasibility report identifying the total flexibility of your site, asset-specific strategies, integration solutions and commercial benefits.

For more details or to arrange a survey, please get in touch.

Open Energi VR works well on desktop, better on mobile and best with a VR headset. Please note, the figures used in this VR are based on current market data and Open Energi’s experience with similar assets and processes across a wide range of sectors. They are intended only as a guide and are no guarantee of future value.