ADE I&C Energy Conference

ADE logo

On the 30th October the Association for Decentralised Energy (ADE) will be hosting a practical conference designed to support developers, suppliers, industrial and commercial customers, funders and consultants in understanding industrial energy use in the future smart system.

Open Energi’s Commercial Director will join key market players and experts, discussing:

  • What will be the most lucrative markets in the future smart system for industrial energy?
  • How can large energy users increase their energy revenue and/or decrease their energy costs?
  • How can we make business energy policy more reflective of business needs?

Date: 30th October 2018

Location: Pinsent Masons, London,  EC2A 4ES

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the event website.

Future of Utilities: Smart Energy 2018 – 20/21.11.18

Future of Utilities: Smart Energy is set to bring together 300+ attendees for two days of collaboration discussing energy storage, supply and smart grid developments.

Featuring technology-driven content about how to make energy retail smarter, and systems more flexible, Smart Energy will showcase the experiences of a wider range of energy companies than ever before. 

Open Energi’s Commercial Director David Hill will join a panel session to explore the business case for storage and different approaches from across the value chain.

Date: 20th-21st November 2018

Panel: 14.35, 20th November

Location: The Tower Hotel, Guoman – London

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the event website.

BNEF Future of Energy Summit

BNEF logo

Since its inception in 2008, the BNEF Future of Energy Summit has featured a unique convergence of the old and the new – traditional players and advanced-energy leaders. It continues to create an environment for making new connections, and serves as a forum to discuss the critical energy issues of today and the next decade.

Date: 1st-2nd October 2018

Location: Intercontinental Hotel, Mayfair, London

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the conference website.

EV Infrastructure Summit – 29.11.18

EV Infrastructure Summit

Taking place on the 29th November, the EV Infrastructure Summit will focus on the opportunities and challenges involved in establishing a UK-wide charging infrastructure as part of the transition to zero emission vehicles.

The day will feature presentations and debates from leading industry experts and government representatives on the key topics involved in the roll-out of the required charging infrastructure.

Open Energi’s Commercial Director, David Hill, is joining a panel discussion on “Making EV’s a positive win for the energy system: opportunities and challenges”.

Date: 29th November 2018

Location: CCT Venues – Docklands, London

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Session: 12.40pm – “Making EV’s a positive win for the energy system: opportunities and challenges”

Further information is available from the event website.

Smart Energy Summit: Industry. Buildings. Cities. – 26/27.03.19

electricity pylons

Held in Moscow, the 3rd Smart Energy Summit: Industry. Buildings. Cities. is designed to unite the largest energy, industrial enterprises and leading world experts in the field of innovative, digital and Internet solutions for the energy sector to explore new models of generation, distribution, management and accumulation of energy. The 2019 programme includes:

  1.  Internet of Energy: Distributed generation, Smart grids and microgrid, Energy storage systems, Digital platforms, Big data analysis, New markets.
  2. Smart Energy Experience & Practice: Energy of industrial enterprises, Energy of buildings and infrastructure facilities, Energy of cities and regions.
  3. Energy Tech Hub: Startup expo, Pitch session, Hackathon.

Open Energi is delighted to be participating in the event. Our Commercial Director David Hill will be discussing new business models for battery storage and presenting practical examples of projects from the UK.

Date: 26-27th March 2019

Location: Moscow

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Further information is available from the event website.

How the rise of ‘Energy as a Service’ can power decarbonisation

open energi wind farm

Energy as a Service is the latest business model innovation to arrive in the energy supply industry. In short it is all about moving away from buying energy on a per unit (p/kWh) basis and moving towards a fixed fee per month within certain volume thresholds; akin to how we pay for mobile phone contracts. Energy as a Service has emerged off the back of disruption to the way we supply, consume and now ultimately buy energy, which has fundamentally changed energy market economics.

This disruption is the result of four major technology-driven trends:

  • Decarbonisation – The growth of energy supply from zero marginal cost renewable resources
  • Decentralisation – The growth in energy generated from smaller scale low carbon resources either on customer sites (Behind-the-Meter) or at the Distribution Level (Distributed Energy)
  • Digitisation – The ability to measure and monitor machine behaviour in real-time and automate how we use and supply energy
  • Democratisation – The rise in consumer participation, control and choice which is increasingly determining how energy is bought and used

Traditional per unit models work where the dominant cost in delivery of the product or service scales according to the volume used. This was true when the majority of power supplied came from sources that required a fuel input e.g. coal and gas. The more energy consumed the greater the proportional cost of buying and burning that fuel to generate more kWhs of power.  Other components which make up the total ‘at-the-meter’ price have also been charged on a per unit basis to ensure those who use more of the electricity network pay more for it; government taxes, utility profit margins and network charges (with some time-of-use element).

However, when you start to use zero marginal cost power the economics get flipped on their head. Renewable ‘fuel’ is free, so the dominant cost in consuming energy becomes the infrastructure needed to deliver it. Wind turbines, PV panels, transmission and distribution cables have low operational costs once built, so the initial capital expenditure is where the dominant cost lies.

Across Europe average wholesale prices now reflect wind and sun patterns more than the cost of coal and gas, and at periods of low demand and high renewable output we consistently see negative prices. Clearly change is needed as consuming more energy at these times is beneficial to the whole system but a per unit charging mechanism disincentivises users from doing that.

Enter, Energy as a Service. Already we are seeing a shift in network charging towards capacity-based charges instead of use-of-system charges. Wholesale prices are not far behind; the task becomes providing the flexibility to firm up renewable output. Thanks to the digital revolution described above this flexibility can come from consumers’ demand, cost-effectively tapping into flexibility inherent in distributed energy resources behind-the-meter.

Take a given offshore wind site, with known capacity factors of about 50%. It is possible to quantify the amount of flexible energy needed to ensure 99% of customer demand is met at all times. Using existing business assets means it is possible to take advantage of zero marginal cost flexibility in everyday processes (such as heating, cooling, pumping, battery storage and CHPs), avoid unnecessary infrastructure upgrades and minimise efficiency losses in transporting power. Once it is understood how much flexible power is needed to firm up the output of renewable generation the next task is what technologies do you use to meet that flexibility requirement.

Artificial intelligence-powered flexibility platforms – like Open Energi’s Dynamic Demand 2.0 technology – which can manage distributed energy resources in real-time, are critical. They can evaluate the amount of flexibility in existing power-consuming assets and processes – in addition to any battery storage and/or flexible generation (such as CHPs) – and map demand to supply. This then becomes a constant, real-time scheduling problem for the platform to manage; invisibly ramping processes up when wind is abundant and storing as much power as possible, or turning processes down to a stable minimum and discharging batteries or using a CHP when wind output is low.  If real-time scheduling isn’t maintained, the cost structure breaks down, so the reliability of these platforms is critical.

What is important to recognise here is that below a certain demand threshold the marginal cost of putting in place this service is the cost of operating the wind and the software required to schedule behind-the-meter flexibility. This is why Europe’s utilities are making huge investments and acquisitions in virtual power plant technology.

By doing so the costs of delivering energy become fixed and predictable and scale with size of connection instead of actual usage. Exactly like the mobile phone industry where the marginal cost of sending a packet of data is immaterial in comparison to network costs of all infrastructure.

For Open Energi Energy as a Service has always been the natural end-game in maximising the value of Demand Response. It shelters consumers from the continuously changing and complex incentives of the existing Demand Response markets, and instead offers a simple proposition: “By installing demand response software across a range of assets you can pay a lower fixed monthly fee for your energy”.

The clarity and certainty offered by Energy as a Service makes it easy to structure simple, long-term financing solutions for different technologies – e.g. solar PV, energy storage, CHP – and allows businesses to concentrate on what they do best.  All the complexities of power procurement and demand response markets are removed in place of a known fixed fee per month that ensures reliable, clean and affordable energy. 

David Hill, Commercial Director, Open Energi

This blog was originally posted on Current News.

The Future of Utilities 2018

Now in its 23rd year, The Future of Utilities is one of the UK’s leading energy and water summits. The event aims to strike a balance between cross-industry discussion and in-depth exploration into customer interactions, energy, and water, to provide the best environment for strategic consultation of all critical issues facing today’s decision-makers.

Date: 20-21st March 2018

Location: etc.venues St Paul’s, London

Topic: How can demand-side response help to deliver a decarbonised energy system?

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Time: 12.25, Energy Stage, 21st March

Further information is available from the conference website.

The Energy Transition World Forum 2018

Energy Transition World Forum

The Energy Transition World Forum is a one-day event that uniquely focuses on the changing needs of the Major Energy Customer.  As both producers and customers – driven by political and technological pressures – make the transition from “black to green” energy, evolutionary shifts are already in progress. This event will bring together energy leaders, speakers and participants from utilities, steel, manufacturing, chemical, automotive and digital disruptor industries to explore the new energy paradigm.

 

Date: 14th May 2018

Location: Okura Hotel, Amsterdam

Speaker: David Hill, Commercial Director

Topic: Industry Disruptor Keynote: How advanced technology and data-driven insight are reducing costs across the energy value chain

Time: 14.15-14.35

Further information is available from the conference website.

Clean Energy News: Q&A Open Energi discusses the future of demand response

Following the launch of the follow-up to its popular demand response product Dynamic Demand, Clean Energy News caught up with Open Energi technical director Michael Bironneau and commercial director David Hill to discuss the platform’s development, demand response’s role in the energy transition and how it will change in the future.

Q: How has Open Energi looked to develop Dynamic Demand 2.0, and what’s contributed to it?

Michael Bironneau (MB): Historically Open Energi has been involved in the control of thousands of distributed assets, and in order to do that we often had to do a lot of very manual work to model the asset or understand its control philosophy. Once we’d done that, we still had to understand how to predict its performance characteristics and forecast when it would be available to us. That’s why our data science team is one of the largest in the business.

Read the full article here.

Battery storage project a ‘blueprint’ for EV charging infrastructure globally

Tesla South Mimms Supercharger and PowerPack

Pairing batteries with EV charging stations can help to align sustainable transport and energy needs for the future.

At South Mimms Welcome Break Motorway Services, we have installed a 250kW/500kWh Powerpack alongside one of Tesla’s largest and busiest UK charging locations. The Supercharger site can charge up to 12 cars at one time, and since popular charging periods often coincide with peak periods of grid demand – between 4pm and 7pm, when electricity prices are at their highest – flexible solutions are needed to ease the strain on local grids and control electricity costs.

Integrating a Powerpack at the location has meant that during peak periods, vehicles can charge from Powerpack instead of drawing power from the grid. Throughout the remainder of the day, the Powerpack system charges from and discharges to the grid, providing a Firm Frequency Response (FFR) service to National Grid and earning revenue for balancing grid electricity supply and demand on a second-by-second basis.

Open Energi own and operate the Powerpack, which is part of our portfolio of assets that help maintain the frequency of the grid. Combining batteries and electric vehicles makes vehicle charging part of the solution to integrating more renewables without affecting drivers, unlocking vital flexibility to help build a smarter, more sustainable system.

The project at South Mimms Welcome Break Motorway Services provides a blueprint for the development of electric vehicle charging infrastructure globally. Moreover, by reducing National Grid’s reliance on fossil fuelled power stations as a means of balancing electricity supply and demand, the Powerpack helps to reduce UK CO2 emissions by approximately 1,138 tonnes per year.