Commercial Analyst

Dynamic Demand 2.0

About Us

Headquartered in London with global ambitions, Open Energi is an energy tech company applying artificial intelligence and data-driven insight to radically reduce the cost of delivering and consuming power.

Our advanced technology platform connects, aggregates and optimises distributed energy assets in real-time, maximising value for end users and providing invisible demand flexibility when and where it is most needed to create a more sustainable energy future.

We’re breaking new ground in demand-side management, working with leading businesses, suppliers, developers and world-renowned technology partners to deliver innovative solutions that put our customers in control of how, when and from where they consume electricity.

If you would enjoy the challenge of deploying a ground-breaking technology into an emerging market and want to work for an innovative company where you have complete belief in the product and service you represent, we might be just the place for you.

The Role

We are looking for a Commercial Analyst to join our growing team. You’ll be reporting to our Commercial Manager and working closely alongside our Data Science and Technology teams to help inform business strategy and ensure our market leading solutions stay ahead of the curve. It’s a start-up environment, so you will be working on multiple tasks and must be comfortable working across teams and projects.

The role will include:

  • Commercial analysis and support
    • Working with data scientists on performance reporting
    • Internal reporting for investors and Finance team
    • Using models and other quantitative methods to support the Commercial team as required
    • Risk and scenario analysis
    • Market research and analysis of UK & international demand response markets
    • Researching new services and assessing their commercial value
    • Business case development and commercial agreements
  • Policy, sales & marketing support
    • Techno-economic modelling
    • Researching emerging technologies relevant to the business (e.g. energy storage)
    • Policy analysis and briefing of business on key industry and regulatory issues

Requirements

We’re looking for someone with:

  • At least 2 years’ work experience in a similar role
  • Strong quantitative background
  • High level of literacy, written communication and analytical skills
  • High level of numeracy & commercial judgement
  • Strong Excel modelling skills
  • Self-starter with effective problem-solving abilities, especially for unstructured tasks
  • A critical thinker with intellectual curiosity and thoughtful opinions
  • Interest or expertise in the energy market
  • Enthusiasm for new technologies and their potential impact
  • Commercial and financial knowledge
  • Excellent communication skills, capable of clearly articulating data to a wide audience

Qualifications

  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject, achieving at least a 2:1
  • Post-graduate education (such as a Masters’) is desirable, but not essential

 Remuneration and Benefits

  • Competitive salary with discretionary bonus
  • Based in Open Energi’s London office
  • Career development opportunities

 To apply

Please send a covering letter and CV to recruitment@openenergi.com. Due to the quantity of applications we receive, we regret that we are unable to give specific feedback on unsuccessful applications.

Utility Week: Open Energi launches AI-driven optimisation platform

Smart energy firm says launch marks “a significant step towards a self-balancing grid”

Open Energi has unveiled a new platform that uses artificial intelligence and machine learning to optimise the use of distributed energy assets in real time.

The smart energy firm says the launch marks “a significant step towards a self-balancing grid that can integrate renewable generation efficiently at scale”.

The company claims its Dynamic Demand 2.0 platform will help businesses to “radically” reduce their energy bills by connecting, aggregating and optimising assets such as industrial equipment, battery storage systems, electric vehicles (EV) and on-site generation.

Read the full article here.

Securing Digital Distributed Energy Infrastructure

Open Energi Engineer

The Internet of Things (IoT), a term used to denote the digital infrastructure where any digitalised asset, no matter how small, can connect to an invisible mesh of other assets through the internet, has recently become synonymous with security breaches and exploitation. This is true not just in a domestic setting, where flaws in Samsung’s ‘Smart Home’ let hackers unlock doors and set off fire alarms[1], but also in industrial IoT systems, where hackers were able to change the levels of chemicals being used to treat tap water[2]. While security breaches in websites are common, with credit card details frequently stolen, breaches to industrial systems connected to the internet are fewer and more recent, as such systems were previously isolated from public networks.

In the world of Demand Side Response (DSR), security is one of the priorities of most asset owners. DSR assets have a core purpose other than helping to balance the energy system, so a DSR provider must be able to demonstrate that they will never prevent the safe and correct operation of the asset, be that treating wastewater in a sewage treatment facility or refrigerating food in a supermarket. This condition must hold even in the presence of bugs in the DSR provider’s software, and even if their own systems are penetrated by hackers. The usual practices of data encryption, strong access controls and network segregation only provide part of the answer, as they still don’t guarantee safe operation under all possible failure modes.

This condition may seem unreasonable, but in critical systems development it is crucial. A nuclear facility operating normally is run through a software system, but all safety-critical checks are duplicated in hardware interlocks that take over should the software fail in any way[3]. These interlocks are immutable and thus immune to hacking or software bugs. In space missions, NASA has since the Challenger and Columbia incidents started to use consensus of multiple software systems developed by several independent teams to control rocket operation to eliminate the possibility that a single bug could affect the mission[4].

As the DSR industry progresses towards standardisation and common best practice guidelines, a key safety requirement must be safe operation of the asset under any failure mode. Open Energi on-site controllers are always supplemented by independent hardware or software interlocks that cannot be modified by us, creating an orthogonal layer of control required to operate critical assets. For example, on asphalt sites, we supplement our own controls with hardware interlocks to disable our control should the temperature of the tank increase beyond a safe limit. On water sites, we augment our controls with independently developed PLC code that checks that the asset is still within its control parameters and disables our control immediately if not. This dual layer of security means that even if our systems are compromised by an attacker, the DSR assets will continue to operate safely.

Michael Bironneau is Technical Director at Open Energi.

[1]     Wired Magazine. May 2016. ‘Flaws in Samsung Smart home let hackers unlock doors and set off fire alarms’. https://www.wired.com/2016/05/flaws-samsungs-smart-home-let-hackers-unlock-doors-set-off-fire-alarms/

[2]     The Register. March 2016. ‘Water treatment plant hacked, chemical mix changed for tap supplies’. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/03/24/water_utility_hacked/

[3]     L.J. Jardine and M.M. Moshkov. Nuclear Materials Safety Management, Vol 2. 1998. See eg. p.151.

[4]     Organizational Learning at NASA: The Challenger and Columbia Incidents. 1989. J. Mahler. See eg. p.63.

Can a sharing economy approach to energy deliver a more sustainable future?

Sunshine through tree tops - green energy

As global demand for electricity grows, are there alternatives to building more power stations which make smarter use of existing infrastructure? And in an industry renowned for high levels of consumer mistrust, could an Airbnb of energy finally deliver a consumer-centric energy market?

Technology is shaping our lives like never before, making our world smarter, more efficient and more connected. In the last decade, it has fuelled an explosion of sharing economy business models — adopted by the likes of Uber, Airbnb and Zipcar — who in just a few short years have revolutionised established industries. But can a sharing economy approach help to tackle one of man-kind’s greatest challenges and deliver clean, affordable and secure energy to all?

Sharing economies are a consumer-led phenomenon which work by exploiting excess capacity or inefficiencies in existing systems for mutual benefit. Take Airbnb for example. The wasted asset is your property and the excess capacity is the space you are not using. By creating a user-friendly platform and giving homeowners the security they need Airbnb have built the biggest hotel chain in the world, surpassing the Intercontinental Group in less than four years. They have achieved this because they haven’t needed to construct a single thing.

So how could this apply to the energy industry? As global demand for electricity grows, are there alternatives to building more power stations which make smarter use of existing infrastructure? And in an industry renowned for high levels of consumer mistrust, could an Airbnb of energy finally deliver a consumer-centric energy market?

Since the world’s first power station was built in 1882 the global energy system has worked on the basis that supply must follow demand. Consumers — businesses and households — have been passive users of power, paying to use what they want when they want, whilst electricity supply has adapted to ensure the lights stay on. This has created inefficient systems built for periods of peak demand — in the UK this is typically between 4–7pm on a cold winter evening — which most of the time are massively underused.

But this is no longer the case. Today, our ability to connect and control anything from anywhere means we can manage our demand for electricity in previously unimaginable ways, and consumers are emerging as a driving force for change.

By connecting everyday equipment to a smart platform (just as you might upload your property to Airbnb), it’s now possible for consumers to take advantage of small amounts of “flexible demand” in their existing assets and processes — be it a fridge, a water pump, or an office air con unit — and sell it to organisations tasked with keeping the lights on — like National Grid.

Applying artificial intelligence and machine learning to govern when and for how long assets may respond gives consumers confidence their equipment’s performance will not be affected, and in return for sharing their “flexible demand”, they benefit from cost savings or direct payments.

This sharing economy approach relies on the power of tech and our ability to orchestrate many thousands of consumer devices at scale. Any one piece of equipment can only make small changes to the timing of its electricity consumption — e.g. delaying when a fridge motor comes on for a few minutes during a spike in electricity demand at the end of a football match — but collectively, the impact is transformational.

It means that when electricity demand is greater than supply, we don’t need to fire up fossil-fuelled power stations. Instead, we can reduce demand by asking non-time critical assets to power down for a short while.

If the wind is blowing and too much electricity is being supplied, we don’t need to let this clean, abundant power go to waste, but can ask equipment to shift its demand and make use of this power as it is available.

And we don’t need to keep building more power stations to meet occasional peaks in demand. Instead, we can distribute demand more intelligently throughout the day, reducing the size of these peaks and making better use of existing capacity.

In the UK, Open Energi’s analysis suggests there is 6 gigawatts of peak demand which can be shifted for up to an hour without impacting end users. Put into context, this is equivalent to roughly 10% of peak winter demand and larger than the expected output of the planned Hinkley Point C — the UK’s first new nuclear power station in generations.

This doesn’t make it easy. Unlike other sharing economy success stories, energy is a public good. The need for incredibly robust solutions means the barriers to entry are high. But, if we can get it right, the prize is enormous; a cleaner, cheaper, more secure energy system which gives consumers control of how, when, and from where they consume their energy.

Businesses have already recognised the power they hold and the benefits it can bring, with the likes of Sainsbury’s, Tarmac, United Utilities and Aggregate Industries adopting the tech and demonstrating what’s possible. Households look set to follow, but wherever the flexibility comes from, it’s clear that consumers and the environment will benefit from a sharing economy approach to energy.

David Hill is strategy director of Open Energi. He is an expert on electricity markets and demand-side flexibility, including demand-side response and energy storage. He joined Open Energi in 2010 after completing an MSc Energy, Trade & Finance at Cass Business School.

The 4th industrial revolution: a smart power revolution?

Sainsbury's deliver demand side response from its stores UK wide

On the 8th September, James Heappey, Conservative MP for Wells took part in a House of Commons debate on the 4th Industrial Revolution.

In his speech he talked about the “smart energy revolution” that is underway in the UK today, and highlighted the pioneering work of two of Open Energi’s customers, Sainsbury’s and Aggregate Industries. Here’s what he had to say:

Speaking twice in 25 hours is a record for me, and I am grateful for the opportunity. I congratulate my hon. Friend Mr Mak, who has secured a worthwhile debate and opened it brilliantly. I apologise for being late, but I was working on the Energy and Climate Change Committee’s paper on renewable heat and transport targets, which will be released this evening. I commend it to the House: it is probably one of the most insightful Select Committee reports that Members will read all year. Indeed, all of our Committee’s reports are insightful.

In summing up yesterday’s debate, the Minister used some fantastic theatrical references, which I hope will become a tradition of his summing-up speeches. He has an encyclopaedic knowledge of the theatre, so we look forward to that. Today, I present, to use my own theatrical reference, the second part of my play in two parts, in which I will talk about the energy opportunities provided by the collision of emerging technologies and our existing energy infrastructure.

There is some dispute over whether this is the third or fourth industrial revolution. A book by Professor Jeremy Rifkin has become a bit of a bible for me, as I have sought to develop my thinking on how energy policy might evolve. He thinks that this is the third industrial revolution, but none the less it is an excellent read that very much pulls in the same direction as those who are advocating the fourth industrial revolution.

Ministers will already have looked in great detail at the National Infrastructure Commission’s “Smart Power” report, which is a fantastic publication setting out how we can harness all these wonderful technologies as we digitise the energy system. The reality, as the report observes, is that we could save £8 billion a year for the UK economy if we digitise our energy system and harness those technologies. That figure represents not just immediate savings on our energy bills, but gains in productivity.

Nicola Shaw, the head of National Grid, told the BBC “Today” programme last week that we are seeing

“a smart energy revolution across the country with consumption adjustments reflecting when energy is cheapest”.

The idea that we have to change our consumption habits to meet a changing energy market sounds like a nightmare to most people, but the reality is that we already have many of the technologies in our homes. Most major white goods manufacturers are producing smart appliances already: they are in our shops and, probably unknowingly, we already have them in our homes. Through the internet of things, they will all start to speak to one another to make sure that they operate at the most efficient and cost-effective time. They also report faults, so people will not have to carry on for years with a fridge that uses more power than it should, because it will already have flagged up its fault to whoever manufactured it. These are exciting times and the technologies already exist. It is not, in my view, going to be a case of opting into them, because manufacturers are building them as standard and they will increasingly do so.

The Government face a challenge in preparing our homes, businesses and society for the internet of things from an energy perspective, so I will give my thoughts on our system preparedness before moving on to examples of where we are already seeing the huge economic advantages.

As Ministers know only too well, the smart meter programme is the keystone in achieving the digitisation of our energy system, and I know that they will be keen to push on with that roll-out at best speed. Everything that we seek to do in bringing technological innovation into the energy space depends on those smart meters being in place to digitise the system. Similarly, on the way in which our grid is put together, we want all our generational capacity—from the smallest to the largest—to be able to speak in real time about what it is producing, so that we can have a more dynamic generation system. We also need to sort out the regulatory framework for storage, because at the moment people have, in effect, to pay for their energy twice: first when it is generated, and secondly when it is released from storage. Surely, that cannot continue for much longer.

We also have to make sure that our distribution networks—the substations in our communities—are capable of dealing with more dynamic demand and clustered demand, particularly overnight, when people might be taking advantage of cheap energy to charge cars, run the washing machine and tumble dryer, and heat immersion tanks. None of that will happen automatically without the Government paving the way. Thereafter, however, I am sure that these technologies will find their place in the market by themselves. They will make life better, and people will buy them as a result. The Government do not need to encourage people every year or so to change their mobile phone, because people just want to have the latest technology at their disposal. I am sure that that will be the case in this area if the Government create the right regulatory framework with energy policy.

I turn to storage. The price of storage has already come down from $3,000 per kWh to about $200 today, and it will come down even more quickly still. We saw over the summer reports about the Tesla Panasonic factory in Colorado, the construction of which is being accelerated quite rapidly given the increase in demand. These are exciting times, because storage is the key to flattening the energy supply curve and unlocking the real potential of renewables.

The real technological wizardry, however, is demand-side response. That may be a combination of words that many in the Chamber have not heard before, but it needs to be at the forefront of the way in which we discuss energy. Flattening the supply curve through the availability of storage deals with only half the problem; flattening the demand curve through demand-side management is equally important.

I have been hugely impressed as I have become enthused about DSR, and as I have gone around various companies that are delivering it, by the scale of the savings that it is bringing to businesses. Marriott hotels have signed up to a DSR contract that saves them hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. Workers at Aggregate Industries’ bitumen plants used to just turn up in the morning and fire up the boilers to get the bitumen tanks up to heat. They would operate over the course of the day, and then they would be switched off. Aggregate Industries now employs technologies that allow it to say, “Our tolerance is that we need to keep these tanks at a certain temperature, and provided that they are at that temperature, we can release energy back to the grid.” It does so, and it gets money for nothing as a result. By employing those technologies, it can sell back energy that it does not need, which it would otherwise just have paid for and wasted. That creates a huge saving.

Similarly, refrigeration is a massive cost for supermarkets and the food industry in general. Sainsbury’s has employed demand-side response, and the store in my constituency in Street, Somerset has released 20 kW of capacity back to the grid simply from DSR. That is extraordinary.

The other area that I want to touch on was the electrification of the transport system. I had to check very carefully with the Clerk of the Energy and Climate Change Committee about when I would find myself in contempt of Parliament, but I understand that if I draw on the evidence rather than on the report itself, it is fine. This is a hugely exciting opportunity for us to employ electric cars and electric haulage systems in the UK. The problem is that I am not sure that we yet have the infrastructure in place to support them, and I am not sure that we have the right fiscal structure to support them either.

I tried to buy an electric car over the summer, and sadly I found that their range was probably not quite enough to allow me to do my duties around my rural Somerset constituency. They are getting there, however, and we just need to incentivise the acceleration of the technology, so that we get beyond the 100-mile range to a range of 200 or 300 miles. If that happens, I think that people will, all of a sudden, go for electric cars quite quickly. All the incentives that the Government have in place—the £4,500 that they contribute towards the car and the contribution they make towards a charging point at the buyer’s home—are fantastic. The Government’s emphasis on establishing a charging infrastructure at motorway service stations and on main roads is also fantastic, but we really need to grow the infrastructure much more if people are to buy the cars and make the saving that we hope they will. The argument is that electric cars will make us more productive as well, particularly when we go beyond merely electric cars to electric autonomous cars, and we find that we can move around our towns and cities much more freely.

Interestingly, in the United States, Coca-Cola has employed hydrogen-electric hybrid vehicles for its entire fleet, and it has made a 20% reduction on its fuel costs. It made that huge saving by employing those technologies and electrifying its transport fleet, which is very exciting. We should look across at that and realise that this is not just something that people do if they are green and they want to be environmentally sensitive. It is something that an individual or a business can do if they want to reduce their operating costs—technology colliding with energy generation and energy consumption to make us more efficient and more cost-effective, and to make all our operating costs that bit cheaper.

Mr Deputy Speaker, you encouraged us to keep within 10 minutes, so I will summarise, rather than go into the many more examples that I am itching to provide. The bottom line is that, while we will focus very much on our digital infrastructure with broadband and 5G mobile phones and we will worry very much about the preparedness of our airports and air routes, as well as of our roads and rail, the energy infrastructure is just as important. In my view, alongside the broadband and mobile phone networks, the three sets of infrastructure of telecoms, broadband and energy will drive the fourth—or third—industrial revolution and allow us to harness all these fantastic technologies. We should seek to do so not just because we are seeking to arrest climate change, but because it is cost-effective, makes business sense, will increase productivity and, ultimately, will be great for our economy.

Access the full debate here.

The Challenges of Device Management in Energy

The Challenges of Device Management in Energy

1248 CEO Pilgrim Beart chats with David Hill, Business Development Director at Open Energi.

P: “David, tell us a bit about what you’re trying to achieve at Open Energi”

D: Open Energi is deploying ‘Internet of Things’ software within electricity consuming assets and paving the way for a new energy system; a system that is cleaner, cheaper, more efficient and more secure than the system we have today.

Our software is able to measure and monitor machine and appliance behaviour in real-time and subtly adjust electricity consumption in response to signals from the market, preventing fossil fuelled power stations from coming online and maximising our use of renewable energy, without any impact on consumer living standards or business productivity.

Every appliance or machine that we connect to using our Dynamic Demand software is another step towards removing power stations from the electricity system all together – and the money that would have been paid to those power stations is instead paid to British businesses.

P: “That sounds like a classic IoT application to me – making better use of a resource, with benefit to all the parties concerned – and helping address climate change too. What stage have you’ve reached in this ambitious goal?”

D: To date we have signed over 25 customers and deployed our software within over 1230 individual assets across 275 sites. Appliances range from Heating, Ventilation and Refrigeration Appliances in Sainsbury’s, to Water Pumps and Waste Management Equipment in United Utilities. The total power of all the devices that Open Energi interacts with is about 45MW, of which we currently bid about 15MW – around 30% – into energy markets operated by National Grid.

30% represents what is typically flexible at any given moment in time. The remaining power is being used for its primary purpose, e.g. heating supermarkets or pumping water. It is only by being able to identify flexibility on a second by second basis that we are able to provide this service.

P:”And can you give us some idea of the sort of challenges that you’ve encountered as you’ve grown in scale?”

One of the key challenges we face is being able to interface with different industrial and commercial processes – ranging from water pumps to bitumen storage tanks to refrigeration systems.  These systems operate in very different ways and generate different kinds of data, so a key challenge for us is being able to collect and view this data in a coherent way, and then understand how all these different processes are consuming energy. 

Overcoming this problem is an essential part of how we can provide a consistent and reliable service to National Grid from many thousands of individual assets.  Today many aspects of our interface with each of these processes inevitably become bespoke, which then leads to challenges in how we maintain and operate the software on all of our devices, particularly as we scale up.

P: “Your growing need for device management rings very true for us – it’s a common story as a connected service starts to achieve scale. We encountered something similar at AlertMe as we scaled from 1,000 to 10,000 devices, which is why we decided to focus on that challenge at 1248. Can you put some more meat on the bones for us?”

A key area for us is being able to simplify how we connect and exchange information with so many different control systems and processes.  Standards could play a key part here – both in terms of how we connect to other devices and what information we exchange.  This would ease the process of connecting and maintaining devices as we scale up and allow us to focus on getting the maximum value out of the energy flexibility that we’re tapping into.

For example, in the future we believe that all appliances with the ability to provide flexibility to the electricity market will come with those principles built in off-the-shelf, so that an air conditioning controller designed to maintain room temperature is every bit as used to responding to electricity market signals as it is to temperature, likewise with water pumps and bitumen tanks.

Device management is very important when trying to operate service based on very large numbers of connected devices; we can only understand and quantify energy flexibility if we have an accurate understanding of which devices are online, and whether they are functioning correctly. Moving from the world we are in now, to the future I just outlined, will need collaboration with companies like 1248.

P: “David, thanks so much for sharing this with us.”

This blog post was originally featured on www.1248.io

Is demand response the Airbnb of energy?

In recent years we’ve learned to find spare capacity in all kinds of places, not least our homes. Imagine if we could do the same with our energy use? David Hill explains why Demand Response could be the Airbnb of the energy market.

The Internet of Things is enabling us to exploit tiny kilowatts of flexible capacity from everyday equipment to build a virtual power station and sell the aggregated energy back to National Grid.

Green Gown Awards recognise University of East Anglia’s innovative approach to energy management

University of East Anglia Logo

University of East Anglia and Open Energi were Highly Commended for their entry in the Technical Innovation for Sustainability category at the 2014 Green Gown Awards.

 

UEA was the first university to install Dynamic Demand across its campus, helping to keep the lights on and boosting its credentials as one of the most sustainable universities in the country.

Air handling units (AHUs) across its estate have been equipped with this unique form of Demand Response and the AHUs are now adjusting their energy consumption instantaneously to help National Grid balance electricity supply and demand in real-time.

What it means to win… “UEA has a top-rated School of Environmental Sciences and we are committed to replicating this success in the sustainability of our campus. Adopting more intelligent ways of managing our electricity demand supports this goal and we are thrilled to win a Green Gown award for our work with Open Energi.“

Professor Edward Acton, Vice-Chancellor

 

What the judges said: An interesting application of technology into the HE sector, where the complexity of power demands across a campus can be used to balance the power system. Clear applicability to other areas, and replicable elsewhere. The “invisibility” of the technological fix is also attractive.

Click here to view the winners’ brochure.

Dynamic Demand wins Innovation of the Year Awards

Business Green Leaders Awards

Open Energi is proud to have been awarded Innovation of the Year at the 2014 BusinessGreen Leaders Awards for its Dynamic Demand technology, a unique form of Demand Response which helps National Grid to balance electricity supply and demand on a second-by-second basis.

Now in their fourth year, the BusinessGreen Leaders Awards celebrate the leading businesses, executives, entrepreneurs, investors, and campaigners from across the green economy, highlighting how these pioneers are driving the emergence of innovative and sustainable new business models and technologies. The Awards were extremely competitive with over 260 entries whittled down to 130 shortlisted entries.

“Everyone at Open Energi is delighted and proud that Dynamic Demand has been recognised by the prestigious BusinessGreen Leaders Awards,” commented Open Energi Commercial Director, Ged Holmes. “Balancing supply and demand is vital to the operation and security of the UK electricity system and Dynamic Demand has a vital role to play in delivering clean, secure and affordable energy in the years to come.”